The Three Best Predictors of On-the-Job Success

I was forced to become a more disciplined and focused interviewer once I started giving my clients (from an employee leasing company) a one year guarantee my candidates would be successful. It took a few years to get there, but it required well-established myths to be discarded and new approaches to be implemented.These were the biggies:

  • Most hiring mistakes are not caused by an inability to do the work. They’re caused by some type of friction between the new hire and the manager, a lack of understanding of real job needs, or a lack of motivation to do the actual work required.
  • First impressions don’t predict on-the-job success or team skills. All they predict is presentation skills. They also exclude some of the best candidates who don’t meet some contrived standard.
  • Intuition and gut feel don’t predict on-the-job success, either. All they predict is the likelihood the company will make a bad decision. Not hiring the best person who isn’t the best interviewer is one of them.
  • The best people have accomplished more with less experience. This is the definition of a high potential person. Despite this, most managers want more experience, not less.
  • A track record of past performance doing equally complex work is a far better predictor of success than box-checking skills and experiences and conducting a behavioral interview.
  • The ability to find solutions to realistic job-related problems is a strong indicator of thinking skills, creativity, planning and potential.

Lou Adler (@LouA) is the CEO of The Adler Group, a consulting firm helping companies implement Performance-based Hiring.   Read more on his strategy of using Performance Based Interview to predict job success by clicking the link below.

The Three Best Predictors of On-the-Job Success

Great Plains Consulting, Inc.